Discussion:
MBAM Gets Good Press
(too old to reply)
Buffalo
2016-06-26 16:28:40 UTC
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http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_ransomware_attack/

"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off
ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with
Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time. Instances of
ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the first step in fighting a
disease is protection," said Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ®
Wadda ya tink, Diesel?

Buffalo
Buffalo
2016-06-26 16:33:08 UTC
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Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_ransomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off
ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with
Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time. Instances of
ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the first step in fighting a
disease is protection," said Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ®
Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
Buffalo
The BIG thing is now that team makes 'backups'. :)
I wonder is that also use MBAM's anti-exploit?
--
Buffalo
m***@invalid.com
2016-06-26 21:38:45 UTC
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On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:28:40 -0600, "Buffalo"
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_ransomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off
ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with
Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time. Instances of
ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the first step in fighting a
disease is protection," said Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ®
Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
Buffalo
What is " TrueCrypt malware"?

TrueCrypt is not malware. So...?
Buffalo
2016-06-26 23:26:16 UTC
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Post by m***@invalid.com
On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:28:40 -0600, "Buffalo"
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_ransomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted paying off
ransomware runners after one of its main test computers got infected with
Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time. Instances of
ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the first step in fighting a
disease is protection," said Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ®
Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
Buffalo
What is " TrueCrypt malware"?
TrueCrypt is not malware. So...?
Nice catch..
Perhaps they meant that the infected was running Turecrypt and it was still
infected with CryptLocker or similar.
Perhaps Dustin will know more about it and enlighten me and others.
--
Buffalo
Diesel
2016-06-30 20:38:13 UTC
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Post by m***@invalid.com
On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:28:40 -0600, "Buffalo"
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_r
ansomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted
paying off ransomware runners after one of its main test computers
got infected with Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time.
Instances of ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the
first step in fighting a disease is protection," said Marcin
Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ® Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
Buffalo
What is " TrueCrypt malware"?
TrueCrypt is not malware. So...?
Crypto based malware. The individual responsible for the PR piece is
using the wrong terminology to describe it. Good of you to notice,
but, you'd be surprised how many haven't. [g] Marcin isn't about to
get into a discussion the specifics, his product is very limited in
that aspect, too.

Same with the west coast labs certification. Malwarebytes is not an
antivirus; that requires an understanding of code that the majority
of staff at malwarebytes cannot grasp, seriously. Those who do
understand what it would take are far and few in between and don't
get to make the executive decisions. It's a good thing most malware
these days is trojan/script kiddie grade material. If the old school
coders were still producing, Malwarebytes would be owned at every
turn.

Did you know, the 2nd in command, Bruce, isn't even a programmer? Do
you know what he does to determine if somethings malware or not?
He'll upload it to something like virustotal to see if it gets any
hits. Then, they'll run an install monitoring program and execute the
sample. Ayep, that's what passes for research there. And, heh, he's
the big chief of the research dept.

I know of NO other AV/AM company that uses that research methodology.
It's not sound, there's many ways to code the sample not to give up
all it's secrets in this way of testing it. Few of the staff would be
the wiser if the sample pulled a fast one on them as a result.

It's why you see the forum full of helpers recommending other
programs to assist when malwarebytes won't load,can't help on it's
own. They ride on the coattales of accomplished programmers and
coders. They absorb the independent ones when/if they can. It's how
they got me to work for them. [g] It's also how they acquired a coder
to write the resident protection module, too.

Someone else ported the engine from Visual Basic over to visual C++,
and, I doubt it was entirely Marcin. He was having a hard enough time
doing VB when I last spoke to him. Bruce, lol, he didn't even get
that far.

The engine design is a bad one. It's database has to be culled due to
it's poorly thought out design. And, the design is to make life
easier for the researchers who've never written a single line of
actual code in their life. When I taught them about string scanning,
I had to explain why you needed to be careful when using it, if you
don't know what the string of bytes represents, you could get
innocent/non malware files falsely accused. Based on the false alarm
reports, they're still 'working on it' ROFL. It's so sad.

Did you know the initial versions people were buying licenses for was
a glorified MD5 hash comparison utility with a fancy GUI? Do you
remember them initially touting a much faster scan time? It's because
I taught Marcin about the MZ header present in executables. I asked,
why are we hashing every single thing on the hard disk? Let's see if
it's an executable, then, we'll hash it.

That's right, I explained (I'm laughing my ass off, sorry, can't help
it) to an 'Antimalware company' about the EXE file header. That's
something I was surprised! to find out they knew nothing about. When
I learned how they tested malware samples, I got a good idea quickly
how.. umm, technologically unadvanced the software was. I shouldn't
bitch too much though, I got a nice raise for sharing that with them.

The quality of actual code that went into Malwarebytes other than
what I shared with them was so poor, I figured out how the
registration system intially worked, on accident. Your 'key' was the
md5 hash of the registration name! I wasn't even trying to crack the
damn thing.

I was checking something else, and, it was later determined to be a
glitch on Marcins end. He had a bug in his code and a particular KEY
command wasn't working as expected. I thought! it was something I was
doing wrong, so I took the program apart to see. Nope, wasn't me. I
was implementing it per documentation, it wasn't being interpreted on
the engine end, due to his bug.

When I explained how string scanning (with wildcards no less) worked,
I got another raise, and they were able to detect hundreds more
samples with a single scan string, vs having to have an MD5 hash for
each one.

So, I got two raises, and had a script kiddie put in charge of my
dept; her reward for being such a good forum helper, I suppose.
Didn't know shit about actual code/executable file layout. But, fully
in charge of my dept! With the attitude to go with it, I don't mind
telling you.

I was planning on sharing disassembler and code step tracing
technologies with them next, but the script kiddie thing pissed me
off royally, so I kept my mouth shut about it. No, Malwarebytes has
no onboard disassembler/code tracing technologies present. It's not
something every tom dick and harry knows how to do... so...I guess
their still working on that too? LARF

At one point, the company and the software had the right idea... they
were working towards it. Greed got in the way, personal egos got in
the way. They've 'made it' now.. so...

You might as well rewear a used condom if you're going to trust
Malwarebytes to protect your PC.

It can delete/reset keys and remove what it thinks are offensive
executables, and, that's all. If said executable contains code that
can infect and/or patch without causing further infection other
executables, Malwarebytes is fuxored and you are too. Malwarebytes
can detect the patched files, using the string scanner technology I
shared with them so they can offer to delete the entire file. Prior
to hiring me though, they couldn't even do that.

Like I said, Malwarebytes still has a long long ways to go.

Cute eye candy with the new versions, though.
--
MID: <nb7u27$crn$***@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
zip file but then not be able to unzip it so I can watch it. That
seems VERY clever!
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=145716711400
Envoy1
2016-07-02 06:00:25 UTC
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Post by Diesel
Post by m***@invalid.com
On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:28:40 -0600, "Buffalo"
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_r
ansomware_attack/
(had to snip - sorry!)
Post by Diesel
Like I said, Malwarebytes still has a long long ways to go.
Cute eye candy with the new versions, though.
Which leaves me wondering what is a decent protection for the home pc
user days?


Envoy
Envoy1
2016-07-02 06:03:28 UTC
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Post by Envoy1
Post by Diesel
Post by m***@invalid.com
On Sun, 26 Jun 2016 10:28:40 -0600, "Buffalo"
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_r
ansomware_attack/
(had to snip - sorry!)
Post by Diesel
Like I said, Malwarebytes still has a long long ways to go.
Cute eye candy with the new versions, though.
Which leaves me wondering what is a decent protection for the home pc
user days?
Envoy
More haste, less speed ....


.. decent protection package for the home pc user these days?

E
Diesel
2016-07-04 03:37:19 UTC
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Post by Envoy1
Which leaves me wondering what is a decent protection for the home
pc user days?
I do apologize in advance for this lengthy reply to your question, As
your question requires a bit of information in order to properly
answer it for you. To leave things out would be doing you an
injustice. Security is something to be taken seriously, and, I'm glad
you asked what should be done.

A layered approach, as always. Avast/Kaspersky/Nod antivirus, take
your pick. With a copy of SAS (super antispyware) resident for
additional AM protection. If you must, you can always keep
Malwarebytes as the freebie non resident backup; for a third opinion.

Also be sure to practice safer hex and teach anyone else who might
use the computer the concepts. To shorten this post, I'll cover the
general rules and provide urls containing more information on the
subject.

As you'll see, my rules are not 100% antipiracy oriented either; I
despise scare mongering tactics. I'm going to tell you straight how
to keep your machine safer, without judging whatever it is you might
be doing with it. Stick to these rules, follow my advice concerning
the software to use, you'll be okay almost all the time. This is a
quick cheat sheet style guide to protecting yourself. It's not
intended for the scope of hardening the machine itself with
additional policies.

1. Keep regular backups of anything important to you on the machine.
Always ensure you have viable copies of the OS, drivers, etc to
restore from in the event you need to do so. This isn't just for
malware protection, it's for the far more likely, eventual hard disk
crash you'll experience. if the data is worth keeping, it's worth
making copies of. Do not store the backups on a partition on the same
physical hard drive as the source. You may not be able to access them
in the event of a hard disk failure; as the partitions both reside on
the same physical device. A complete image stored on external media
would be a fine choice for backup purposes. I personally use and
recommend Macrium Reflect for Windows users.

2. Keep your antivirus, antimalware, browser, plugins, java, adobe,
etc, up to date. Do NOT ignore update notices on any of them; As they
all update frequently to address security issues. Occasionally,
they'll add a feature you might not want/might not even use. It's a
fair trade off for the security update work.

3. Whenever possible, Do not use an administrator level account
unless you're doing something to the machine which requires it.
Establish a restricted/normal user account as your daily account and
use that, instead. This will reduce the possible damage a malware
sample could do in the event you do encounter one that's accidently
let loose on your machine.

4. Be very careful where you surf. To help you stay away from bad
sites install a website rating browser plug-in like WOT and make sure
you only visit websites rated "Green" by the plug-in.

5. Never click on attachments you get via email unless you're
expecting the attachment. Even if it's coming from someone you know.
Email the individual back and confirm they intended to send this
attachment to you; give them the filename and the size if you have it
available to you. Always save the attachment to disk and allow your
scanners to examine it, before you attempt to open it. It also
wouldn't hurt to upload it to a site like virustotal.com either, for
another opinion.

6. Only download files from trusted sources. The first choice should
be the authors site, if at all possible. Followed up by your
favorite, but, dependable and reliable freeware distribution site.
completelyfreesoftware.com, snapfiles.com, softpedia.com,
majorgeeks.com, etc

7. Never install programs that friends give you on removable media
unless you have verified that they are clean by submitting them to
free web based file scanning services such as Jotti or Virus Total.

8. Never accept free toolbars, media players or other unsolicited
software offered to you by a website.

9. Don't be the first to download a new program posted to a file
sharing site. Wait for others to check it out and rate/comment on it.
Read the comments. Be *very careful* installing the software.
Whenever possible, send individual executable files to sites like
virustotal.com for another opinion; extra caution due to the nature
of the software in this case is always warranted. If you're still
unsure, it's better to delete and locate a 'safer' copy than it ever
is to chance it.

10. If you insist upon using file sharing sites for certain things;
Always be careful when doing so. Be sure to read the ratings/comments
and only download from established/well known sites. Whenever
possible, only download from known/trusted uploaders who've already
put some effort into establishing a solid reputation as a reliable
and dependable uploader. They won't intentionally put it in harms way
to send your computer malware. Piratebay for example has flags for
uploaders who have uploaded quality content which is what it was
expected to be, and, nothing more. Download from them before
downloading from any username lacking a flag.


11. When installing software, be sure you look around for boxes
checked/unchecked by default. Determine what they will do if
unchecked/checked and make sure it's what you want. Many times, you
can avoid unwanted toolbar installations, browser plugins and home
page changes just by following this rule.


http://www.claymania.com/safe-hex.html
http://www.techsupportalert.com/safe-hex-safe-computing-practices.htm

Macrium reflect free (majorgeeks):
http://preview.tinyurl.com/nx8ybsh

Avast Antivirus (majorgeeks):
http://preview.tinyurl.com/kjcutz8

Superantispyware (Authors site):
http://www.superantispyware.com/

Malwarebytes Antimalware (Authors site):
https://www.malwarebytes.com/mwb-download/

If funds are an issue (I completely understand), you can get away
with running free Avast antivirus for AV/Some AM, and keep a copy of
Sas as well as Malwarebytes installed for on demand scanning
purposes, as both allow it without being registered. When and if
funds become available, I'd recommend purchasing a license to SAS to
activate it's resident features. Your money would be well spent on
software that has been years in the making and is a mature product
with a solid well trained team behind it.

I would not at this time, suggest you throw your hard earned money
away on Malwarebytes antimalware. Continue to use it as 3rd opinion,
on demand scanning utility only.

It is important to note, each utility is only as good as it's most
recent update. Please be sure you always ensure they have the most
recent available before doing any manual scanning with the tools.

Also, when doing a full scan, be sure you disconnect from the
internet (pull the cat5 cable, turn off wifi, whichever method of
connection you use) and disable all but the scanner you intend to
use. Run each scanner one at a time, with the others disabled for
best results. ** It's important to run them one at a time with the
both the av/am resident modules disabled while doing so.

In other words, be sure all resident modules are off AND ONLY scan
your system with one program at a time. Wait for each one to
completely finish and exit before you run the next one.

The software due to the way in which all three function under the
hood can conflict by competing with each other for file access under
some conditions. This can actually result in a potential software
application crash and or possible OS based lockup issue, depending on
the severity and type of file access failure.

If you do experience what appears to be an application lockup and/or
GUI lockup.. be patient and try waiting it out before you do
anything. SAS and MBAM do have timeouts concerning file access and
will move onto the next file in line after a certain period of time,
if at all possible.

Each could possibly detect something the others will miss and this
will always be subject to change. The actual likelyhood of you
catching something as long as you practice safer-hex that a decent AV
and SAS resident alone cannot deal with though aren't that high.
Realistically, you have a better chance of being hit by a bus AND a
dump truck in some horrific multi vehicle (yours and those) crash AND
you walk away without so much as a scratch, but, your ride is kaput.
:)

I will continue to keep an eye on SAS and Malwarebytes and update my
opinion of both as is necessary. Sas is quick to resolve issues that
are brought to their attention, Malwarebytes doesn't seem to have
that line of thought.

Full Disclosure:

I am a former Expert Malware Researcher employed by Malwarebytes
(That of Expert Malware Researcher and Antipiracy technologies) for
two or so years. As such my written statements are my opinions and
thoughts on the subject and mine alone.

Malwarebytes Corporation does not condone, approve of, nor is in any
possible way responsible for the contents of any of the posts I've
written concerning Malware and various Antimalware software,
including their own. As these are completely my opinions on the
subject I'm the only individual responsible for their content.

Questions concerning what I've written *should be* addressed towards
myself. Malwarebytes Corporation support is under absolutely no
obligation to answer any queries concerning the contents of my posts.

I've also written and maintained my own Antimalware utility known as
BugHunter. More information concerning it can be found at it's
present homepage location: http://bughunter.it-mate.co.uk/
--
MID: <nb7u27$crn$***@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
zip file but then not be able to unzip it so I can watch it. That
seems VERY clever!
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=145716711400
Envoy1
2016-07-13 09:42:03 UTC
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Post by Diesel
Post by Envoy1
Which leaves me wondering what is a decent protection for the home
pc user days?
I do apologize in advance for this lengthy reply to your question, As
your question requires a bit of information in order to properly
answer it for you. To leave things out would be doing you an
injustice. Security is something to be taken seriously, and, I'm glad
you asked what should be done.
No problem with a lengthy reply.
Thank you kindly for taking the time and trouble to give some very
meaningful advice.

Take care.

Envoy
Envoy1
2016-07-13 09:42:53 UTC
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Post by Envoy1
Post by Diesel
Post by Envoy1
Which leaves me wondering what is a decent protection for the home
pc user days?
I do apologize in advance for this lengthy reply to your question, As
your question requires a bit of information in order to properly
answer it for you. To leave things out would be doing you an
injustice. Security is something to be taken seriously, and, I'm glad
you asked what should be done.
No problem with a lengthy reply.
Thank you kindly for taking the time and trouble to give some very
meaningful advice.
Take care.
Envoy
And my apologies for a late reply. Have been in hospital for a spell.
Diesel
2016-06-30 20:38:13 UTC
Permalink
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Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_r
ansomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted
paying off ransomware runners after one of its main test computers
got infected with Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time.
Instances of ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the
first step in fighting a disease is protection," said Marcin
Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ® Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
ROFL. They need to worry about their own inhouse affairs before they
promise the world to others. I've never seen such vulnerabilities in
software that have been present for years, never shored up, no rush
to do so once they become public knowledge.

If you rely on Malwarebytes resident module for real time protection,
you probably deserve to get 0wned and punished with a nasty payload.
you can checkout the cute icon while your box is 0wned. LOL

They cannot compete with the technologies, solid technologies already
present in most AV products. They've still got a long ways to go.
Despite the fact I worked for them at a point, I didn't share all of
the tricks of the trade. They were essentially a glorified non
replicating trojan scanner with limited recovery options.

They wanted to remain that way, too. I discussed implementing other
technologies with them numerous times. They didn't have but two other
people on payroll who understood a damn thing about it. We were
outvoted and outnumbered. They'd rather have script kiddies offer the
advice and they'd go from there. Dismissing what we suggested.

Dude, they put a script kiddie in charge of the executable malware
research dept. A non coder deciding what I was allowed/wasn't allowed
to do concerning fighting malware. If all malware was
script/simpleton based, I'd have no problem with it. I do have a
problem when you can't read a fucking line of ASM and you're giving
me orders though.

I earned my knowledge, the script kiddies haven't. I worked for it. I
spent the weekends, the nights without sleep, in debug/diassembler
windows. I've no patience for some fucktard who can't code their way
out of a paperbag in HLL let alone asm making the final decisions. It
wasn't right.

Marcin doesn't do assembly and isn't a wizard with crypto, either.
Only a few people on the staff understand Assembly well, and, I'd say
none of them have a firm grasp on crypto. They'll need to up their
game considerably if they want to offer real protection/recovery from
ransomware based malware.

Not to worry though, I'm sure this PR piece will sell more licenses
and get two thumbs up from people who don't know any better.
Malwarebyts is like any other large corporation now. If you catch on
and stop using them, another hundred suckers will take your place and
their bottom line won't be affected.
Post by Buffalo
Buffalo
--
MID: <nb7u27$crn$***@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
zip file but then not be able to unzip it so I can watch it. That
seems VERY clever!
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=145716711400
Buffalo
2016-07-02 16:47:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Diesel
Post by Buffalo
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2016/06/24/nascar_team_redflagged_by_r
ansomware_attack/
"The Circle Sport – Leavine Family Racing (CSLFR) has admitted
paying off ransomware runners after one of its main test computers
got infected with Truecrypt malware"
"Companies of all types and sizes can fall victim at any time.
Instances of ransomware infection are growing rapidly, and the
first step in fighting a disease is protection," said Marcin
Kleczynski, CEO of Malwarebytes. ® Wadda ya tink, Diesel?
ROFL. They need to worry about their own inhouse affairs before they
promise the world to others. I've never seen such vulnerabilities in
software that have been present for years, never shored up, no rush
to do so once they become public knowledge.
If you rely on Malwarebytes resident module for real time protection,
you probably deserve to get 0wned and punished with a nasty payload.
you can checkout the cute icon while your box is 0wned. LOL
They cannot compete with the technologies, solid technologies already
present in most AV products. They've still got a long ways to go.
Despite the fact I worked for them at a point, I didn't share all of
the tricks of the trade. They were essentially a glorified non
replicating trojan scanner with limited recovery options.
They wanted to remain that way, too. I discussed implementing other
technologies with them numerous times. They didn't have but two other
people on payroll who understood a damn thing about it. We were
outvoted and outnumbered. They'd rather have script kiddies offer the
advice and they'd go from there. Dismissing what we suggested.
Dude, they put a script kiddie in charge of the executable malware
research dept. A non coder deciding what I was allowed/wasn't allowed
to do concerning fighting malware. If all malware was
script/simpleton based, I'd have no problem with it. I do have a
problem when you can't read a fucking line of ASM and you're giving
me orders though.
I earned my knowledge, the script kiddies haven't. I worked for it. I
spent the weekends, the nights without sleep, in debug/diassembler
windows. I've no patience for some fucktard who can't code their way
out of a paperbag in HLL let alone asm making the final decisions. It
wasn't right.
Marcin doesn't do assembly and isn't a wizard with crypto, either.
Only a few people on the staff understand Assembly well, and, I'd say
none of them have a firm grasp on crypto. They'll need to up their
game considerably if they want to offer real protection/recovery from
ransomware based malware.
Not to worry though, I'm sure this PR piece will sell more licenses
and get two thumbs up from people who don't know any better.
Malwarebyts is like any other large corporation now. If you catch on
and stop using them, another hundred suckers will take your place and
their bottom line won't be affected.
Post by Buffalo
Buffalo
What do you think about their Anti-Exploit software (MBAE)?
Have you looked at that software yet?
Thanks and have a fun 4th Weekend.
--
Buffalo
Diesel
2016-07-04 03:37:17 UTC
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Post by Buffalo
What do you think about their Anti-Exploit software (MBAE)?
It has a long ways to go too.
Post by Buffalo
Have you looked at that software yet?
Briefly, yes.
Post by Buffalo
Thanks and have a fun 4th Weekend.
You too!
--
MID: <nb7u27$crn$***@boaterdave.dont-email.me>
Hmmm. I most certainly don't understand how I can access a copy of a
zip file but then not be able to unzip it so I can watch it. That
seems VERY clever!
http://al.howardknight.net/msgid.cgi?ID=145716711400
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